Pinata Rage and Coconut Macaroons

It was the longest piñata hit in history. This gaily coloured Mexican bombonierre was seemingly made of cast iron. Possibly forged in the smelters of dwarven folk from the Kingdom under the Lonely Mountain (a Tolkien reference to all you non Hobbit loving peeps).

Child after strong armed child faced this monster. Bashing it with the supressed rage of youngsters against the iron fists of their parental controllers. Sadly, it was to no avail.

Finally, deliverance came in the guise of the smallest and youngest child (an angelic blonde haired 4 year old). It is difficult to explain the collective surprise at witnessing this beautiful young person flying into, what will henceforth be known as, ‘piñata rage’.

There was violent and assured bashing, followed by targeted smashing. The paper mâché split open and Mexican manna fell from the heavens. All was once again right with the world.

Kid 1 came up to me afterwards, proclaiming ‘The bowl of holiness has been split!’ His hands overflowing with sweet loot, some whole and some crushed. Not caring that they were in a less than perfect state, he snarfled them all in record time.

These coconuts macaroons may not have been a piñata full of sweet and lollylike goodness but they were still a huge hit with Kid 1. Being gluten free, the Yak was also a fan.

Some folk may say the macaroon is the poor, tenement living cousin to the more difficult to make and penthouse living macaron. I tell all those people to rack off. Yes, the macaroon has only 4 ingredients and yes, they are quick and yes, you don’t have to cure the egg whites for 2 days. So, yes, maybe after careful consideration ‘those people’ have a point. But as that overused cooking TV show catchphrase goes, ‘I made them with love’. (I don’t often cook with hate in my heart, although sometimes, I have been know to give a misbehaving cake batter a stern glance or two).

Floral vanilla and chewy coconut, reminiscent of a Polynesian wonderland. Close your eyes as you bite into their crispy exterior and you could be lying on a beach in Tahiti. They may easy peasey lemon squeezy but they are bloody delicious.

COCONUT MACAROONS

WHAT YOU NEED
2 egg whites
Pinch salt
100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
125g desiccated coconut (or shredded)
1/4 tsp vanilla bean paste (or pure vanilla essence)

HOW YOU DO IT
Preheat the oven to 150C and line two baking trays with baking paper.
Place the egg whites and salt in a medium sized bowl and beat them until they are stiff.
Gradually beat in the sugar and fold in the remaining ingredients.
Drop the mixture in teaspoonfuls about 5cm apart on the trays (as I did) or use a piping bag with a 1cm tip.
Bake for about 20 minutes, rotating halfway through. When the macaroons are dry and cooked, they will be a pale, pinky-gold.
Cool on wire racks and store airtight, Makes about 20.

Recipe from Ladies, A Plate by Alexa Johnston.

A quick shout out to the lovely chicks from I Need a Feed and Vegas Hungry Girl for nominating me for some blogger awards lately. Not sure when I will get to that but in the meantime, just wanted to give you the links to their delightful blogs.

http://ineedafeed.wordpress.com

http://vegashungrygirl.wordpress.com

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35 thoughts on “Pinata Rage and Coconut Macaroons

  1. Macaron, macaroon – same history. The double ‘o’ is an English addition to a French word which happened sometime in the 17th or 18th century – a way of getting English speakers to pronounce the long ‘o’. A long (and linguistically geeky) way of saying that all that snobbishness over macarons as we know them today is a totally modern and rather stupid construct. I like coconut macaroons!

  2. Definitely making these. I’ve made meringue cookies before but never put coconut in them. Sounds like a heavenly combination–especially that beautiful crust over a chewy interior…
    I’ve never tried to make fancy macarons, but… cured egg whites??? Sounds like I don’t even want to go there.

  3. I absolutely MUST find a time and place to use the fantastic phrase, “The bowl of holiness has been split!” Those are absolutely perfect words combined to make the perfect declaration.
    And I adore macaroons–especially as Veronica has pointed out, sunk in a pot of melted dark chocolate. True heaven. Cheers!

    • Mrs Peak, I do hope you find the right place and time. Given your crazy life of scientific adventure with teenagers, I have a feeling that moment may be just over the horizon. Next time these little rippers get made, I is getting me some dippable hot chocolate. 🙂

  4. Pingback: Weighing Worth / Coconut, Strawberry & Balsamic Cookies {dairy free, gluten free} | The Imperfect Kitchen

  5. I hate coconut, blech. But I’m going to visit my dad in a week, and coconut macaroons are his FAVORITE. I’m so making these. My mom NEVER lets him eat anything yummy, she’s all “You don’t need that…” The man is old and tired. Let him have his freaking cookies.

    • You are a good and kind daughter Naptime. Not one to let your aversion of the nutty coco stop you allowing this poor, tired and old man some macaroon sweetness into his life. Shine that meringue light on him once more, you will be daughter number one.

  6. pinata rage – love it! I’ve been to those kid’s parties where the damn thing just will not yield. At one desperate party the dad took a saw to the pinata to get to the sweet innards. These macaroons look textbook perfect 🙂

    • Thanks Mrs Hungry! A saw nonetheless! Desperate but much needed measures must be taken when ‘piñata rage’ has not visited itself upon a child. I remember in days gone by when our Mum made her own piñatas from balloons and paper mâché. I loved the concept but have thus far, not got there myself. Doubt I ever will. 🙂

  7. Pingback: Easter egg biscuits and Miffy | The Cheergerm & the Silly Yak

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